Commercial break. In fact, Elaine weighed the "sponge-worthiness" of potential lovers to determine whether sleeping with them was worth giving up one of her coveted sponges. [1] These additional plot threads were either drastically reworked or completely replaced. Mayer Laboratories announced it will relaunch the Today Sponge, the contraceptive made famous by a Seinfeld episode. George then tells Susan against Jerry's wishes, resolving their argument. The Today sponge contains the spermicide nonoxynol-9, which may contain certain risks for those using the sponge multiple times a day, or for those at risk for HIV. The new sponge will be exactly the same as the original with a few utilitarian improvements, such as clearer instructions and a toll-free number to call for answers to questions. It not only introduced us to four of the zaniest characters ever written (hello Jerry, Elaine, George and Kramer!) Jerry tells George he is "out of the loop" because he told Susan. When the apparatus became scarce and, ultimately unavailable, many sponge devotees were outraged. On the list of sponsors Jerry sees Lena Small, whom he wanted to call for a date, but her number is unlisted. I did a practice run to see if I could do it properly. In these cases, nonoxynol-9 can irritate the tissue, which leads to an increased risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. It was discontinued when the original manufacturers, American Home Products, decided not to spend the hefty amount needed to bring its factory equipment up to Federal Drug Administration (FDA) standards. "Ribbon bullies", led by Bob and Cedric, beat Kramer nearly senseless. With George and Susan suffering increasing sexual frustration for lack of the sponge, she convinces him to use a condom, but by the time they get the wrapper open his erection has passed. New scene - Jerry on the phone in his apartment. Determined that her 60 sponges must last the rest of her life, Elaine refuses to give one to George so that he can have makeup sex with Susan and puts Billy through a rigorous examination to make sure he is "sponge-worthy". The sponge? Seinfeld is one of the most definitive sitcoms of all-time. In addition, the device's insertion can be tricky, and proper insertion is key to its effectiveness. Tune in tonight to see the episode! [3], A paper by Avinash Dixit used this episode to explore an option value problem in determining the "spongeworthiness" of potential partners. Kramer passes both of them an AIDS Walk sheet for them to sign. The launch is at least the fifth in the history of … "The Sponge" is the 119th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. “Sponge-worthy” The fact that Luke from Gilmore Girls is the one trying to prove himself to be “sponge-worthy” makes this clip even better. The Today sponge "was manufactured until 1995, when FDA imposed new manufacturing standards." At Monk's Café, Kramer asks Jerry and Elaine to sponsor him for an AIDS walk. He still manages to stumble across the finishing line before collapsing; Jerry, however, assumes this was because of his staying up all night and walks away in scorn. The sponge, unlike the pill, the most popular prescription method, it has few side effects and can be used at a moment's notice. Does anyone really care what color car the longtime “Seinfeld” writer Peter Mehlman happened to be driving in 1995, on the day he heard on the radio that the Today Sponge was being discontinued, inspiring a beloved episode? The way she … After visiting multiple stores which are out of stock, she purchases 60 sponges at Pasteur Pharmacy. This was the ninth episode for the seventh season. Go figure. but it’s also responsible for some of the most notable quotes that we still use today, like “sponge-worthy,” “yada yada yada” or “no soup for you!” [2] The AIDS walk scene was filmed on the Central Park set of the CBS Radford lot. "The Sponge" is the 119th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. "I've been astounded by the reception," says Gene Detroyer, Allendale's chief executive officer, concerning women's reactions to the possible reintroduction. Sponge-worthy Sure, Elaine might like a guy enough to jump in the hay without thinking twice, but when the Today Sponge went off the market and … Jerry and his pals George, Elaine and Kramer can find trouble anywhere. "Seinfeld" The Sponge (TV Episode 1995) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. The contraceptive sponge has a strap on one side for easier re… A 1995 Seinfeld episode, "The Sponge", revolved around Elaine's attempts to procure her favorite form of birth control, the discontinued Today sponge, and her rationing them based on whether a potential partner was "sponge-worthy". In this episode, George and Elaine face sexual crises when the Today brand of contraceptive sponges is taken off the market, while Kramer participates in an AIDS walk and Jerry dates a tireless do-gooder whose phone number he got from the list of Kramer's sponsors. Jerry takes down the numbe… Kramer finds participating in an AIDS walk to be quite a rough experience. It aired on December 7, 1995. When she finally does find a store that has some left, she decides to buy the whole case that they still have in stock. Hi, it's Jerry Seinfeld. Options, particularly over-the-counter ones, are few. In this episode, George and Elaine face sexual crises when the Today sponge is taken off the market, while Kramer participates in an AIDS walk and Jerry dates a tireless do-gooder whose phone number he got from the list of Kramer's sponsors. At the AIDS walk, he refuses to wear an AIDS ribbon. sponge worthy – (related terms: The Today Sponge) 1.Elaine’s description to determine if a man is worth using a contraceptive sponge for intimate relations 2. due to her birth control method, The Today Sponge, being taken off the market.3. The discontinuation of the Today Sponge is also a factor for George and Jerry. Everybody loves the sponge. – The Today Sponge contraceptive is back on the market, eight years after it disappeared from U.S. drugstore shelves in an alarming turn famously depicted on a Seinfeld episode. The sponge gained pop culture status when the TV … Measuring 1.75 inches in diameter and .50 inches in thickness, the sponge is coated with sperm-killing nonoxynol-9 and has a dimple in the middle that fits over the cervix. Elaine, excited by how things are going with her boyfriend, Billy, says she is going shopping for contraceptive sponges. Unless a woman is sure her partner is disease-free, condoms should be used in combination with the sponge. KRAMER: But wasn't that taken off the market? Roughly 250 million of the sponges were sold from 1983 to 1995, and women favored it … My decision to seek out the sponge as my new preferred contraceptive was entirely based on pop culture references. It is soft and disk-shaped, and made of polyurethane foam. [2] The idea of Jerry modifying the waist size on the tag of his pants was contributed by Jerry Seinfeld himself. In fact, the FDA never revoked its approval. George tells his fiancée Susan that Jerry actually wears size 32 and modifies the tag to a 31; this initiates a fight about sharing other people's secrets. The Today sponge, discontinued in 1995, may be back on shelves this fall, thanks to Allendale Pharmaceuticals of Allendale, New Jersey. When the apparatus became scarce … JERRY: Hello, Lena? The Today Sponge is a safe, hormone-free birth control alternative for couples that provides 24hr protection. Peter Mehlman was inspired to write this episode when he heard that the extremely popular Today sponge was being taken off the market. Once the most popular female-controlled, over-the-counter form of birth control, the sponge was used by 6.4 million women between 1983 and 1995. The sponge provides women with another choice in birth control. Though their first sexual encounter leaves her with no regrets, she denies him morning-after sex, unwilling to spare two sponges. Firmly unwilling to change birth control methods, Elaine goes on a hunt for the sponges. Jerry takes down the number and calls Lena. The Today sponge. After an absence of more than 10 years, the Today Sponge contraceptive has been cleared for return to the U.S. market. #12DaysOfFestivus #Festivus I did a practice run to see if I could do it properly. Legend has it that they were driven to hoard the devices as Jerry Seinfeld's pal Elaine did on the TV show. This passes along the phone tree until it reaches Lena. "The Sponge" is the 119th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. Today's grievance is all about sponge-worthiness. Mehlman had in fact once obtained a woman's unlisted number from an AIDS walk list. Despite Jerry's warnings, Kramer stays up all the night before playing poker. "In combination with a condom, it's a great sort of one-two punch," says Gardos, "and a great back-up method if a condom breaks. The Today sponge, discontinued in 1995, may be back on shelves this fall, thanks to Allendale Pharmaceuticals of Allendale, New Jersey. "I think the sponge will also have a utilization for women who wish to use a barrier and prefer one that is disposable and discreet," says Archer. The Today Sponge contraceptive, memorialized in an episode of the "Seinfeld" sitcom when it was pulled from the market in 1995, could return … When Kramer is exhausted just from walking up the stairs to his apartment, Jerry fears he is too out-of-shape to do the AIDS walk. (WebMD) -- After a four-year lapse, that little, round, pink piece of foam that gained national attention on the sitcom "Seinfeld" is scheduled for a comeback. "I knew it was going to be well-received because of focus groups we did, but this has surpassed my greatest expectations," he observes. KRAMER: I read it in Wall Street Week...Louis, uh, Rukeyser. The sponge was not pulled from the marketplace because of lack of safety or efficacy, as some rumors had suggested. My decision to seek out the sponge as my new preferred contraceptive was entirely based on pop culture references. Because a doctor's visit is not required to procure the sponge, women do not have the opportunity to be shown proper use by a medical professional. According to Susan Tew, spokeswoman for the Alan Guttmacher Institute, which tracks the effectiveness of birth control methods, the sponge's failure rate hovers around 20 percent largely because of incorrect use. It is a proven contraceptive with over 250 million sponges sold and is available over-the-counter at major retailers and online Available over the counter at After Elaine hears that her preferred form of birth control, The Today Sponge, is going off the market, Elaine conducts a hard target search of the city, within a 25 block radius, to find as many sponges as she can. Go figure. Just in case, Armstrong asked him, and lets us know. The contraceptive sponge contains spermicide, which blocks or kills sperm.Before having sex, you insert the sponge deep inside the vagina so that it covers the cervix. When Lena tells him she doesn't mind him taking her number from the AIDS walk list, he gets turned off from her being "too good". Anyway, I found the Today sponge at CVS and bought a box. Seinfeld: Sponge Worthy (Clip) | TBS Jerry tells George that he found Lena on the AIDS walk list. It aired on December 7, 1995. Your vaginal muscles hold it in place. This was later revisited in the series finale when the pharmacist testifies against Elaine for buying a case of sponges. According to Dr. David Archer, an obstetrician/gynecologist at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia, the sponge's effectiveness is due primarily to the nonoxynol-9. The sponge is particularly helpful for women who can't take hormonal contraceptives, such as the pill, or those who are sensitive to latex. While reading the list of signatures Jerry sees a girl's name (Lena, played by Jennifer Guthrie) whom he once met, but doesn't know her unlisted number. Kramer informs her the sponge was taken off the market. It aired on December 7, 1995. While some believe that the device also functions as a barrier, keeping the sperm from entering the cervix, Archer says studies to support that assumption have not been performed. The product had several setbacks while marketed, including a link to toxic shock syndrome. The contraceptive sponge has bounced back yet again. At Lena's, Jerry finds half her closet space is occupied by contraceptive sponges and realizes that "she is depraved." Peninsula College Basketball, Sorel Toddler Snow Boots Size Chart, Higher Colleges Of Technology Contact Number, Type Of Rabbit With Long Hair, Relating To An Italian Scientist Crossword Clue, How To Respond To Hey Text From A Girl, Nature Instagram Highlight Cover, Behold The Lamb Lyrics And Chords, Best Radio Scanner, " />
privateschooljewel
hardcore password
today sponge seinfeld

A ribbon-like loop aids in removing the device -- this might be trying to some users. So when I saw the Seinfeld episode I wondered if they ever brought back the sponge and I could start using it. He's received an outpouring of e-mail messages from women who can't wait to get their hands on the sponges. ELAINE: Off the market? Failure rate for the male condom is 12 percent, while that for spermicides is about 21 percent. [4][5], "The Writers: Peter Mehlman: The Genesis of a Seinfeld Episode", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Sponge&oldid=989554879, Short description is different from Wikidata, Television episode articles with short description for single episodes, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 19 November 2020, at 17:42. Now that Allendale owns the equipment and rights, the company hopes to make the sponge widely available once again. Jerry boasts that he has been wearing size 31 pants since college. The contraceptive sponge is a type of birth control (contraceptive) that prevents sperm from entering the uterus. "When it comes to sexual health, options are a good thing," says Sandor Gardos, Ph.D., a San Francisco-based sexologist. And this time it is repackaged for a younger generation who may not remember the Today Sponge or the 1995 episode of “Seinfeld… ", Journal of the American Medical Association Contraception Information Center, Fewer infections for back-sleeping babies. When the … sponge-worthy In 1995, pharmaceutical company Wyeth ceased production of the Today Sponge, and later that year Elaine bemoans the loss in the episode "The Sponge." In 1998 Allendale Pharmaceuticals acquired the rights to the Today sponge, and it was once again available. Just give me the case. [1] His initial plan was to dovetail Elaine's hoarding of the Today sponge with Kramer and Newman trying to run a stock market scam, George and a girl agreeing to date for a week and then break up by mutual consent, and Jerry trying to conceal from Lena the fact that he got her number from an AIDS walk list. This was the ninth episode for the seventh season. However, he is compelled to tell her his secret about his pant size and she dumps him. Sure, the interaction between the main characters is foremost, but the periphery details are just as important to the central storylines. Web posted at: 4:31 p.m. EDT (2031 GMT). June 6, 1999 Aside from spermicides and the female condom, the sponge is the only nonprescription alternative for women. A show about something: That time Yankees great Joe DiMaggio almost went on ‘Seinfeld’ Updated Jan 08, 2021; Posted Jan 08, 2021 Joe DiMaggio won nine World Series titles in … In this episode, George and Elaine face sexual crises when the Today brand of contraceptive sponges is taken off the market, while Kramer participates in an AIDS walk and Jerry dates a tireless do-gooder whose phone number he got from the list of Kramer's sponsors. Jerry, Elaine, and Kramer are at Monk's Cafe and they mention that Jerry still wears a size 31 pair of jeans. So when I saw the Seinfeld episode I wondered if they ever brought back the sponge and I could start using it. For starters, women who are sensitive to nonoxynol-9 can't use it. her screening process consists of thorough and specific questions to determine if she should use one of her limited supply (one case) of sponges. The soft, concave Today Sponge prevents pregnancy by covering the cervix and releasing spermicide. Their trials and tribulations of life on New York City's Upper West Side can center on lost parking spots, forgotten names, re … NBC. The Today Sponge. Today Sponge provides effective birth control without "pill" side effects. Kramer also mentions the female contraceptive sponge is being taken off the market. This was the ninth episode for the seventh season. JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS (ELAINE BENES) It’s a shame about Julia Louis-Dreyfus, isn’t it? As with most contraceptives, there are drawbacks to the sponge. [3], The "ribbon bullies" story was motivated by the Seinfeld crew's dislike for being expected to wear AIDS ribbons at the Emmy Awards. No, no...no way. However, it needs to be moistened with water before it is used. Another drawback is that the sponge offers little or no protection from sexually transmitted diseases. The Today sponge, discontinued in 1995, may be back on shelves this fall, thanks to Allendale Pharmaceuticals of Allendale, New Jersey. What makes Seinfeld such a classic series is the sheer number of hilarious things found in each episode. Anyway, I found the Today sponge at CVS and bought a box. Commercial break. In fact, Elaine weighed the "sponge-worthiness" of potential lovers to determine whether sleeping with them was worth giving up one of her coveted sponges. [1] These additional plot threads were either drastically reworked or completely replaced. Mayer Laboratories announced it will relaunch the Today Sponge, the contraceptive made famous by a Seinfeld episode. George then tells Susan against Jerry's wishes, resolving their argument. The Today sponge contains the spermicide nonoxynol-9, which may contain certain risks for those using the sponge multiple times a day, or for those at risk for HIV. The new sponge will be exactly the same as the original with a few utilitarian improvements, such as clearer instructions and a toll-free number to call for answers to questions. It not only introduced us to four of the zaniest characters ever written (hello Jerry, Elaine, George and Kramer!) Jerry tells George he is "out of the loop" because he told Susan. When the apparatus became scarce and, ultimately unavailable, many sponge devotees were outraged. On the list of sponsors Jerry sees Lena Small, whom he wanted to call for a date, but her number is unlisted. I did a practice run to see if I could do it properly. In these cases, nonoxynol-9 can irritate the tissue, which leads to an increased risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. It was discontinued when the original manufacturers, American Home Products, decided not to spend the hefty amount needed to bring its factory equipment up to Federal Drug Administration (FDA) standards. "Ribbon bullies", led by Bob and Cedric, beat Kramer nearly senseless. With George and Susan suffering increasing sexual frustration for lack of the sponge, she convinces him to use a condom, but by the time they get the wrapper open his erection has passed. New scene - Jerry on the phone in his apartment. Determined that her 60 sponges must last the rest of her life, Elaine refuses to give one to George so that he can have makeup sex with Susan and puts Billy through a rigorous examination to make sure he is "sponge-worthy". The sponge? Seinfeld is one of the most definitive sitcoms of all-time. In addition, the device's insertion can be tricky, and proper insertion is key to its effectiveness. Tune in tonight to see the episode! [3], A paper by Avinash Dixit used this episode to explore an option value problem in determining the "spongeworthiness" of potential partners. Kramer passes both of them an AIDS Walk sheet for them to sign. The launch is at least the fifth in the history of … "The Sponge" is the 119th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. “Sponge-worthy” The fact that Luke from Gilmore Girls is the one trying to prove himself to be “sponge-worthy” makes this clip even better. The Today sponge "was manufactured until 1995, when FDA imposed new manufacturing standards." At Monk's Café, Kramer asks Jerry and Elaine to sponsor him for an AIDS walk. He still manages to stumble across the finishing line before collapsing; Jerry, however, assumes this was because of his staying up all night and walks away in scorn. The sponge, unlike the pill, the most popular prescription method, it has few side effects and can be used at a moment's notice. Does anyone really care what color car the longtime “Seinfeld” writer Peter Mehlman happened to be driving in 1995, on the day he heard on the radio that the Today Sponge was being discontinued, inspiring a beloved episode? The way she … After visiting multiple stores which are out of stock, she purchases 60 sponges at Pasteur Pharmacy. This was the ninth episode for the seventh season. Go figure. but it’s also responsible for some of the most notable quotes that we still use today, like “sponge-worthy,” “yada yada yada” or “no soup for you!” [2] The AIDS walk scene was filmed on the Central Park set of the CBS Radford lot. "The Sponge" is the 119th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. "I've been astounded by the reception," says Gene Detroyer, Allendale's chief executive officer, concerning women's reactions to the possible reintroduction. Sponge-worthy Sure, Elaine might like a guy enough to jump in the hay without thinking twice, but when the Today Sponge went off the market and … Jerry and his pals George, Elaine and Kramer can find trouble anywhere. "Seinfeld" The Sponge (TV Episode 1995) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. The contraceptive sponge has a strap on one side for easier re… A 1995 Seinfeld episode, "The Sponge", revolved around Elaine's attempts to procure her favorite form of birth control, the discontinued Today sponge, and her rationing them based on whether a potential partner was "sponge-worthy". In this episode, George and Elaine face sexual crises when the Today brand of contraceptive sponges is taken off the market, while Kramer participates in an AIDS walk and Jerry dates a tireless do-gooder whose phone number he got from the list of Kramer's sponsors. Jerry takes down the numbe… Kramer finds participating in an AIDS walk to be quite a rough experience. It aired on December 7, 1995. When she finally does find a store that has some left, she decides to buy the whole case that they still have in stock. Hi, it's Jerry Seinfeld. Options, particularly over-the-counter ones, are few. In this episode, George and Elaine face sexual crises when the Today sponge is taken off the market, while Kramer participates in an AIDS walk and Jerry dates a tireless do-gooder whose phone number he got from the list of Kramer's sponsors. At the AIDS walk, he refuses to wear an AIDS ribbon. sponge worthy – (related terms: The Today Sponge) 1.Elaine’s description to determine if a man is worth using a contraceptive sponge for intimate relations 2. due to her birth control method, The Today Sponge, being taken off the market.3. The discontinuation of the Today Sponge is also a factor for George and Jerry. Everybody loves the sponge. – The Today Sponge contraceptive is back on the market, eight years after it disappeared from U.S. drugstore shelves in an alarming turn famously depicted on a Seinfeld episode. The sponge gained pop culture status when the TV … Measuring 1.75 inches in diameter and .50 inches in thickness, the sponge is coated with sperm-killing nonoxynol-9 and has a dimple in the middle that fits over the cervix. Elaine, excited by how things are going with her boyfriend, Billy, says she is going shopping for contraceptive sponges. Unless a woman is sure her partner is disease-free, condoms should be used in combination with the sponge. KRAMER: But wasn't that taken off the market? Roughly 250 million of the sponges were sold from 1983 to 1995, and women favored it … My decision to seek out the sponge as my new preferred contraceptive was entirely based on pop culture references. It is soft and disk-shaped, and made of polyurethane foam. [2] The idea of Jerry modifying the waist size on the tag of his pants was contributed by Jerry Seinfeld himself. In fact, the FDA never revoked its approval. George tells his fiancée Susan that Jerry actually wears size 32 and modifies the tag to a 31; this initiates a fight about sharing other people's secrets. The Today sponge, discontinued in 1995, may be back on shelves this fall, thanks to Allendale Pharmaceuticals of Allendale, New Jersey. When the apparatus became scarce … JERRY: Hello, Lena? The Today Sponge is a safe, hormone-free birth control alternative for couples that provides 24hr protection. Peter Mehlman was inspired to write this episode when he heard that the extremely popular Today sponge was being taken off the market. Once the most popular female-controlled, over-the-counter form of birth control, the sponge was used by 6.4 million women between 1983 and 1995. The sponge provides women with another choice in birth control. Though their first sexual encounter leaves her with no regrets, she denies him morning-after sex, unwilling to spare two sponges. Firmly unwilling to change birth control methods, Elaine goes on a hunt for the sponges. Jerry takes down the number and calls Lena. The Today sponge. After an absence of more than 10 years, the Today Sponge contraceptive has been cleared for return to the U.S. market. #12DaysOfFestivus #Festivus I did a practice run to see if I could do it properly. Legend has it that they were driven to hoard the devices as Jerry Seinfeld's pal Elaine did on the TV show. This passes along the phone tree until it reaches Lena. "The Sponge" is the 119th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. Today's grievance is all about sponge-worthiness. Mehlman had in fact once obtained a woman's unlisted number from an AIDS walk list. Despite Jerry's warnings, Kramer stays up all the night before playing poker. "In combination with a condom, it's a great sort of one-two punch," says Gardos, "and a great back-up method if a condom breaks. The Today sponge, discontinued in 1995, may be back on shelves this fall, thanks to Allendale Pharmaceuticals of Allendale, New Jersey. "I think the sponge will also have a utilization for women who wish to use a barrier and prefer one that is disposable and discreet," says Archer. The Today Sponge contraceptive, memorialized in an episode of the "Seinfeld" sitcom when it was pulled from the market in 1995, could return … When Kramer is exhausted just from walking up the stairs to his apartment, Jerry fears he is too out-of-shape to do the AIDS walk. (WebMD) -- After a four-year lapse, that little, round, pink piece of foam that gained national attention on the sitcom "Seinfeld" is scheduled for a comeback. "I knew it was going to be well-received because of focus groups we did, but this has surpassed my greatest expectations," he observes. KRAMER: I read it in Wall Street Week...Louis, uh, Rukeyser. The sponge was not pulled from the marketplace because of lack of safety or efficacy, as some rumors had suggested. My decision to seek out the sponge as my new preferred contraceptive was entirely based on pop culture references. Because a doctor's visit is not required to procure the sponge, women do not have the opportunity to be shown proper use by a medical professional. According to Susan Tew, spokeswoman for the Alan Guttmacher Institute, which tracks the effectiveness of birth control methods, the sponge's failure rate hovers around 20 percent largely because of incorrect use. It is a proven contraceptive with over 250 million sponges sold and is available over-the-counter at major retailers and online Available over the counter at After Elaine hears that her preferred form of birth control, The Today Sponge, is going off the market, Elaine conducts a hard target search of the city, within a 25 block radius, to find as many sponges as she can. Go figure. Just in case, Armstrong asked him, and lets us know. The contraceptive sponge contains spermicide, which blocks or kills sperm.Before having sex, you insert the sponge deep inside the vagina so that it covers the cervix. When Lena tells him she doesn't mind him taking her number from the AIDS walk list, he gets turned off from her being "too good". Anyway, I found the Today sponge at CVS and bought a box. Seinfeld: Sponge Worthy (Clip) | TBS Jerry tells George that he found Lena on the AIDS walk list. It aired on December 7, 1995. Your vaginal muscles hold it in place. This was later revisited in the series finale when the pharmacist testifies against Elaine for buying a case of sponges. According to Dr. David Archer, an obstetrician/gynecologist at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia, the sponge's effectiveness is due primarily to the nonoxynol-9. The sponge is particularly helpful for women who can't take hormonal contraceptives, such as the pill, or those who are sensitive to latex. While reading the list of signatures Jerry sees a girl's name (Lena, played by Jennifer Guthrie) whom he once met, but doesn't know her unlisted number. Kramer informs her the sponge was taken off the market. It aired on December 7, 1995. While some believe that the device also functions as a barrier, keeping the sperm from entering the cervix, Archer says studies to support that assumption have not been performed. The product had several setbacks while marketed, including a link to toxic shock syndrome. The contraceptive sponge has bounced back yet again. At Lena's, Jerry finds half her closet space is occupied by contraceptive sponges and realizes that "she is depraved."

Peninsula College Basketball, Sorel Toddler Snow Boots Size Chart, Higher Colleges Of Technology Contact Number, Type Of Rabbit With Long Hair, Relating To An Italian Scientist Crossword Clue, How To Respond To Hey Text From A Girl, Nature Instagram Highlight Cover, Behold The Lamb Lyrics And Chords, Best Radio Scanner,

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS
Read Comments

Leave a Reply